Monday, August 14, 2017

Health care reform should point to single-payer - Loveland Reporter-Herald

Health care reform should point to single-payer - Loveland Reporter-Herald
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Health care reform should point to single-payer
POSTED:   08/13/2017 08:35:15 PM MDT

The Affordable Care Act was signed into law March 23, 2010. The GOP immediately began calling for its repeal, yet until recently, they gave no thought about a replacement.

Seven years! When they finally began proposing replacements, they all had one thing in common: depriving access to health care for millions. This after the president promised that "everyone" would be covered and for less.

Republicans control all levels of the federal government. They have no one to blame but themselves, because they're trying to reconcile one faction that wants to do something (especially GOP governors who fear cuts to Medicaid), with another that would have the market solve the problem — the market that before Obamacare allowed people to be refused insurance for pre-existing conditions or because a lifetime limit was reached.

The fact is, Obamacare works pretty well, especially in states that expanded Medicaid for those who can't afford insurance. Most of its failures have come in red states that refused to do so. Also, how many shortcomings might have been avoided had the GOP decided to participate in the process instead of just saying no since day one? But maybe there's an even better way.

After World War II, we helped Japan and much of Europe set up universal health care. Yet in 1949, when President Truman proposed it for the U.S., it was defeated by calling it socialized medicine. You will note that not one of those nations ever repealed it. Nor has anyone in those countries ever gone bankrupt or lost a house because of medical expenses. Or had to beg for proper medical care. Plus it's cheaper because no profits are added or huge salaries paid and far fewer people deal with billing. Maybe it's time for Americans to follow our own lead and reconsider universal health care.

Ken Bublitz
Loveland

Single Payer or Bust? - The New York Times

Single Payer or Bust? - The New York Times

Forget about single-payer healthcare. This California congressman has the real solution: Medicare for all - LA Times

Forget about single-payer healthcare. This California congressman has the real solution: Medicare for all - LA Times

Saturday, August 5, 2017

Employer-based health coverage likely to stay awhile | AM 1440 KYCR - Minneapolis, MN

Employer-based health coverage likely to stay awhile | AM 1440 KYCR - Minneapolis, MN

Health care access should NOT be linked to your job.  It is not good for small employers and it certainly is not good for the individual's ability to choose their job.

Universal healthcare bill attracted lots of lobbying | The Sacramento Bee

Universal healthcare bill attracted lots of lobbying | The Sacramento Bee

So much of our health care money (which includes our tax money) goes to pay for non-medical care things.  Lists like this need to be made public all over the country.  Example of cost seldom, if ever, mentioned that would be saved via Medicare for All are lobbying, campaign contributions and advertising.

Douglas Turner: Dems divided on universal health care - The Buffalo News

Douglas Turner: Dems divided on universal health care - The Buffalo News

A negative view on possibilities.  Points our need to plan for what to do with all those currently working to sell health insurance.

Canadian unions push for Pharmacare – a single-payer prescription drug plan – People's World

Canadian unions push for Pharmacare – a single-payer prescription drug plan – People's World

Thursday, August 3, 2017

Universal Health Care Can Work: But the Case Must Be Made for How to Pay and How Money Will Be Saved | Alternet

Universal Health Care Can Work: But the Case Must Be Made for How to Pay and How Money Will Be Saved | Alternet

Single Payer? Take a Look At How South Korea Did It. – Mother Jones

Single Payer? Take a Look At How South Korea Did It. – Mother Jones

Medicare-for-All Isn’t the Solution for Universal Health Care | The Nation

Medicare-for-All Isn’t the Solution for Universal Health Care | The Nation

Where Are the Single-Payer Wonks? | New Republic

Where Are the Single-Payer Wonks? | New Republic

Molina Healthcare to drop out of Wisconsin's Obamacare marketplace

Molina Healthcare to drop out of Wisconsin's Obamacare marketplace

This does show a big impact in WI for ACA members. But, my main reason for posting this is 2fold.

1. This company, like many, many more nationwide, find it financially workable to continue managing Medicaid and state government welfare medical plans even though they say ACA is no longer financially feasible. That tells us we really need to learn more about how our tax money is going to profit them and why.

2. The decisions by these and other for profit insurance corporations to drop out of ACA is based on making a profit. The ACA says they can't use more than 20% of their premium income/subsidies for administrative overhead. Medicare and such costs in other countries is like 2% or 3%. Their top lever execs get millions in compensation. Millions are and will lose health care because millionaires aren't making enough profit.

Tuesday, August 1, 2017

Minn. individual health plans could see smaller 2018 hikes - StarTribune.com

Minn. individual health plans could see smaller 2018 hikes - StarTribune.com

Understanding Republican Cruelty - NYTimes.com

Understanding Republican Cruelty - NYTimes.com

"Or to put it another way, Republicans start from a sort of baseline of cruelty toward the less fortunate, of hostility toward anything that protects families against catastrophe.

In this sense there’s nothing new about their health plan. What it does — punish the poor and working class, cut taxes on the rich — is what every major G.O.P. policy proposal does. The only difference is that this time it’s all out in the open."

Monday, July 17, 2017

Bruce Montplaisir: Presidential values | Local | winonadailynews.com

Bruce Montplaisir: Presidential values | Local | winonadailynews.com

Love this statement:

"What’s wrong with a health plan where if you get sick or injured your medical needs get addressed, without you having to guess which illness or which injury you are going to have so you get a policy that will cover your unknown future needs? Does that sound like a single-payer system? The people Congress consulted with on health care are insurance companies who are in business to make money not provide health care."

Friday, July 14, 2017

Want National Health Insurance? Dump the Term ‘Single Payer’—and ‘Medicare for All’ Too | The Nation

Want National Health Insurance? Dump the Term ‘Single Payer’—and ‘Medicare for All’ Too | The 
Nation


".....no one I’ve ever interviewed in another country talks about their health systems in such narrow, self-interested terms as Americans do.

Changing the narrative won’t be easy. Americans don’t want their money used to pay for someone else’s insurance, although that kind of cross-subsidization is central to Medicare, a point that has never been made clear to beneficiaries or the general public.

....Half don’t want to pay for other people’s health care.

....changing the discourse around health insurance. Shifting the language to “guaranteed lifetime coverage for all” can’t help but push that change along."

Monday, July 10, 2017



Baldwin Likely To Support Single-Payer Health Care Bill | Wisconsin Public Radio

Baldwin Likely To Support Single-Payer Health Care Bill | Wisconsin Public Radio

How Much Is a Dead Poor Person Worth to the Wealthy? $3 Million

How Much Is a Dead Poor Person Worth to the Wealthy? $3 Million

"There is a cost in lives for a lack of healthcare. How many additional people die a year is up for some debate by experts. Numbers range from 18,000 to almost 45,000, and that's at current population levels. But they agree that more people die when healthcare isn't available.
So, assume the population won't go up and that the estimated number who will die is on the low end of the spectrum. The repeal or delay of taxes is expected to be $541 billion over ten years, or an average $54.1 billion a year. Divide that by 18,000 and you get about $3 million a person. Each person will be allowed to die so that taxes can decrease and that the wealthiest can collectively retain that much money."

Saturday, July 8, 2017

Attack of the Republican Decepticons - The New York Times

Attack of the Republican Decepticons - The New York Times
"The main story here is very simple: In order to free up money for tax cuts,
G.O.P. plans would drastically cut Medicaid spending relative to current law, and they would also cut insurance subsidies, making private insurance unaffordable for many people not eligible for Medicaid."

The dumbest criticism of single payer health care - The Washington Post

The dumbest criticism of single payer health care - The Washington Post

"Most people....aren’t hoping for some glorious Randian future where the noble rich get health coverage and the weak and sick are left to their own devices. That may be Paul Ryan’s fantasy, but for most people, it’s a nightmare."

Wednesday, July 5, 2017

Tale of Two Nations: The Way Ahead | Medpage Today

Tale of Two Nations: The Way Ahead | Medpage Today



This is the last of a five part series.  The links to 1-4 are at the bottom of that page.

If you want to read all five and have it available off line or to print, check out this:

Tale of Two Nations Series


'Single-Payer' Healthcare Isn't Necessary -- But Single Pricing Is

'Single-Payer' Healthcare Isn't Necessary -- But Single Pricing Is

Talks about how to achieve universal health coverage via single pricing.  Interesting take on the issues.

Saturday, July 1, 2017

State Single Payer And Medicaid Buy-In: A Look At California, New York, And Nevada

State Single Payer And Medicaid Buy-In: A Look At California, New York, And Nevada



The media does not
dig into this enough to know just how ingrained private for profit
companies are in the current Medicare and Medicaid systems and how
they are hidden in the proposals outlined here. Those corporations
currently make profits off of Medicare and Medicaid. The programs
originally were intended to be public with government setting rates
and paying vendors who agreed to sign up. Now the hidden system
(unaccountable as to finances as well) is that the government pays
the insurance company a per person fee who in turn is the one to pay
the vendors in their network for the covered services. My point is
that the politicians are being paid millions to keep the private for
profit insurance companies in the game and doing so even in the
proposals. For example, in CA Kaiser Permanente will stand to make
out like a bandit with their proposal for single payer.

Friday, June 30, 2017

Why US health care costs defy common sense (opinion) - CNN.com

Why US health care costs defy common sense (opinion) - CNN.com

Medicare for All

The Economist/YouGov Poll
April 2-4, 2017

81. Do you favor or oppose expanding Medicare to provide health insurance to every American?

60% Favor strongly or favor somewhat

23% Oppose strongly or oppose somewhat

https://d25d2506sfb94s.cloudfront.net/cumulus_uploads/document/divhts7l9t/econTabReport.pdf

==

The Economist/YouGov Poll
June 25-27, 2017

61. Do you favor or oppose creating a single-payer health care system, in which all Americans would get their health insurance from one government plan that is financed by taxes?

44% Favor strongly or favor somewhat

31% Oppose strongly or oppose somewhat

https://d25d2506sfb94s.cloudfront.net/cumulus_uploads/document/p97ezf7wcq/econTabReport.pdf

===


Comment by Don McCanne

During a time when there is a crescendo of support for single payer/Medicare for All, the Economist/YouGov polls suggest that support declined during the past couple of months. There is a lesson here, but it is not that single payer support is fading.

The single payer policy community would recognize these two questions as being essentially the same from a policy perspective. But the layman hears the first question as being the expansion of Medicare to cover everyone (Medicare for All), whereas the second question is about single payer, government, and taxes (single payer). The first is about a popular insurance program which we have all earned and eventually participate in, and would it be that everyone could be included. The second is about government taking over health care and us being taxed for it when the insurance benefit at work seems to be working just fine, and the boss is already paying for most of it anyway. At least that’s often the perception.

We already knew this. “Medicare for all” polls better than does “single payer.” What is reassuring is that people are beginning to understand the single payer concept well enough such that there is more support than opposition, even if it is a government program for which we will be taxed. The term “single payer” is out there and will be used by friend and foe alike, so people have to understand that it refers to an improved version of Medicare in which everyone gets to participate.


The lesson? We should not only continue with but we should expand our education and advocacy activities through coalitions and grassroots efforts. The people are getting the word. Support is burgeoning. Soon the public will be immunized against the soundbites of the opponents.